Tuesday, September 28, 2010

We had a meeting.

Nothing makes you feel quite as much of an ineffective failure as an IEP meeting. I went in with a 31-slide presentation about Joey, a 3-page handout of concerns passed out a week before, and I came out with... a flip-flopped schedule. He'll go to math in the inclusion room, and language arts in the self-contained room.

Some things got said. The school OT insisted the IEP go back to consult-only because she "can't deal with his behaviors in 1:1". She's right. She can't. Because she doesn't have the skills to provide my child with appropriate OT. And I said so. I don't think I beat about the bush, either. I'm not happy because my child clearly is in desperate need of OT services, but this lady definitely does not have the skill set to provide them, and there is no other OT in the school. Is that clear enough?

We tossed around some strategies for dealing with Joey's issues, because I learned at this meeting that 3 weeks into the school year, and the inclusion folks have been able to do zero academics with him. The school folks asked how long it took for Joey to settle in at the last school. They were a bit unhappy when I noted he was settled in within a couple weeks there. We're not even close to settled here.

But in the end, what actually happened? We flipped his schedule. Woo. Hoo.

It may help. It may not. Im not sure they understood why they were doing it, just that it was a suggestion tossed out there to try.

I'm working on a follow-up letter. This is starting to get ugly.

9 comments:

kristi said...

Oh good lord. What a mess.

farmwifetwo said...

OMG an OT that doesn't know how to work with an autistic child...

Problem is, with those kind of professionals "you can tell them, you can tell them often.... but they aren't going to listen".

Is there other options.... other schools???

Joeymom said...

Our system is very small. Only one school at each level. We may be shopping for a lawyer.

little.birdy said...

Joey isn't going to go away just because he's going through a difficult time right now. You'd think they'd be falling over themselves to make everyone's school experience more pleasant. Also, I doubt the legality of bumping someone to consult just because you are having trouble dealing with behaviors.

KWombles said...

I'm so sorry. ((())) I hope it gets worked out for Joey.

Club 166 said...

Deep breath...

Take another one...

OK, now go and write your letter. Don't be snide, rude, or snippy (this coming from a guy who got up at an IEP meeting and told them that the prisoners at Abu Graib were treated better than my son). :) Use the letter to document what was said (the bit about not being able to deal with him 1:1), and calmly lay out the reasons why a solution needs to be found.

Then go and find that lawyer, as you'll probably need one.

Sending good wishes your way.

Joe

Stimey said...

Maybe you should start making a list of private schools they can pay to send Joey to since they can't provide an education for him at his school.

Dude. I'm so sorry. Let me know what I can do.

Amanda said...

My office mate sued her school district when they failed to teach her severely dislexic son to read by the 4th grade-- and continued to provide the exact same IEP and services that failed him every year despite no progress. The result? The school paid $20,000 a year for her son to go to a special school in a neighboring district that had special (effective) programs in place for severe dyslexia. He's a well-read adult fireman now. They HAVE to provide effective services or pay for him to get them somewhere else. You have an IEP, medical documentation-- make them step up!
My momma bear is coming out all the way up here!

mommy~dearest said...

AAAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHHH!

Momzilla is clawing her way out for you...

That is so frustrating. I'm so sorry it's such a freakin' pain, and the OT is obviously an idiot.

~xoxo~